1.8 TSI SC FR - suspension question

Aug 7, 2020
27
1
Hi guys,

Some advice please. The car is now handling better and turning in more precisely and with little remoteness or wallow. I checked the pressures this morning (one front was 34 psi and another was 31, while both rears were on 26). They've now been put back to 32 psi on both fronts and 29 psi on both rears. Would this earlier uneven reading have significantly negatively affected the handling? I've also now checked the distance from the bottom of the wheel arch to the top of the alloy wheel using the top of the second measuring metrics on a tape measure. Presumably the top metric is centimetres and the bottom is millimetres?

So the rears are 10 cms/2.5 millimetres (left) and 10.3 (right) and the fronts are 10.35 (left) and 10.8 (right). Could this variance in the front be affecting handling? Remember that the pressures are now correct at 32 for both fronts and 29 for both rears. The car is going to the fitting garage on Friday. How would they adjust the front to create a more even left/right ride height or is a variance of 4.5 millimetres between the left and right sides of the front axle negligible to the point it wouldn't affect dynamics?

Thanks,

Josh
 

Jazzjames

Active Member
Sep 13, 2018
136
60
Germany
Tyre pressures make a big difference to handling, however the pressures weren’t massively out. Check them more regularly if you feel the difference.

Cars don’t have perfect side-to-side weight distribution: the transversely-mounted engine, and battery slung out to the side see to that. So I would be surprised if most cars didn’t have the same sort of variation you have measured.
 

Mr Pig

Active Member
Jun 17, 2015
2,195
707
How would they adjust the front to create a more even left/right ride height or is a variance of 4.5 millimetres between the left and right sides of the front axle negligible to the point it wouldn't affect dynamics?

You're not measuring the axle, you're measuring the front wings which are thin bits of non-structural bent metal that have zero relationship to the chassis of the car. If you ask them to fix a difference of a few mm on the wings they'll laugh at you. Or behind your back once you're gone.
 
Aug 7, 2020
27
1
That's what I'm looking to establish: is it an acceptable variance that won't affect dynamics? Garages can be very difficult to deal with especially with my condition. I'm not afraid to point out issues or ask for things to be rectified. If they nastily choose to laugh and dismiss me so be it. Are the figures I've given of 10.3 - 10.8 cms reasonable and normal and are the metrics cms and mms? Will a 500 mile odd round trip to Bala, near Snowdonia help settle the dampers (let them bed in) or doesn't this happen till 1-2,000 or beyond? Sorry for the questions but this is new to me!
 

Mr Pig

Active Member
Jun 17, 2015
2,195
707
Will a 500 mile odd round trip to Bala, near Snowdonia help settle the dampers (let them bed in) or doesn't this happen till 1-2,000 or beyond?

I've never heard of car dampers needing to bed in. I can see the seals etc loosening up but I would've thought that the forces involved would to high for seal stiction to be an issue.

I can't see them entertaining this. If you start talking about a 3mm difference between the two wings they are definitely going to tell you to feck off. Don't do it.
 
Aug 7, 2020
27
1
I understand your reluctance to challenge such a small variance. Initially several posters said it was sitting too high. Now I've measured it and provided the distance between arch bottom and the top of the alloy what are your thoughts? I can ask Seat for the specific measure they use to judge suspension height and see how my car compares. It's going to the fitting independent garage on Friday for them to check that the dampers were installed correctly and that there isn't unacceptable variances or looseness that could cause issues.
 

Mr Pig

Active Member
Jun 17, 2015
2,195
707
I understand your reluctance to challenge such a small variance.

Honestly, don't go there. The wings of the car are essentially cosmetic. They just bolt on. They have nothing to do with the actual ride height of the car and there is enough variance in the fit that a few mm of a difference is nothing. If you complain about that you'll look like an idiot.

If the car is sitting significantly higher I can only think the wrong dampers were fitted, but you say they're the right ones? The standard/S/SE suspension sits 20mm higher and is softer than the FR. If you fitted those dampers it would explain everything I reckon.
 
Aug 7, 2020
27
1
But that's the point - it's actually sitting a little lower than yours Mr Pig!! Remember you said it was 11 cm from the arch to top of the alloy? That's why I've been using this measure. I imagine the variances in wing fitment are miniscule otherwise they wouldn't get through pre-production VAG controlled testing. The shock absorbers that have been fitted have the same model number as those that came off it (originals that were fitted at the factory - all had a production date of 27 February '14). They were also confirmed by Seat as being the correct model for PX14 WZO, a 1.8 TSI FR SC. It has 17 inch alloy wheels too. While 18 inch alloy wheels are an option the only rear shock absorbers available for the 1.8 TSI and 184 bhp 2.0 diesel are 'fr' spec because these engines aren't offered in SE spec! There were several options for the front shocks. Again, I went with the correct front ones too. My preference was actually for SE shocks but they weren't offered or described as compatible with the multi-link 'fr' spec. 1.8 tsi. I understand car dynamics as well as the most nuanced enthusiasts and many engineers. The feeling before the tyre pressure adjustment was a floating, bobbing, remote sensation. It didn't have the carefully judged more compliant SE 'ride' characteristic.
 

adam davies

Active Member
Dec 30, 2019
97
42
Sounds like the car is to firm you should have bought a 1.4 tsi with softer setup. Hapoy driving.
 
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