Leon eHybrid

sfmk2.

Active Member
Apr 5, 2012
875
3
So... I had a Mk2, have a Mk3, and now the Mk4 eHybrid FR tickles my fancy...

Allegedly it can do up to 800km (500m) on a full petrol/electric combined run.

It has a 13kWh capacity battery.

Anyone know what the petrol tank capacity is?

My FR 150 Diesel does 500m from a tank now - tank is 50L from memory.

I'd like to think you wouldn't be burning 50L petrol to get that 500m but I can't see the petrol tank capacity detailed anywhere.

Ta!
 
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CupraGeezer

Active Member
May 11, 2018
316
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As ever with a plug-in hybrid, the fuel consumption will depend on how often you stop to recharge it.

Electric-only range is about 35 miles so a range of 500 miles will require a fuel consumption of 42.3 mpg assume a 50 litre tank. That's feasible, I guess, but it sounds a bit high in most circumstances, given that the consumption will be higher than a petrol only model once the battery is empty due to the higher weight.

Split the range into a number of shorter journeys with a recharge in between and 500 miles starts to look realistic.

As ever, ignore official test results, they're meaningless in the real world.
 

seatgraham

Active Member
Feb 14, 2012
400
33
As ever with a plug-in hybrid, the fuel consumption will depend on how often you stop to recharge it.

Electric-only range is about 35 miles so a range of 500 miles will require a fuel consumption of 42.3 mpg assume a 50 litre tank. That's feasible, I guess, but it sounds a bit high in most circumstances, given that the consumption will be higher than a petrol only model once the battery is empty due to the higher weight.

Split the range into a number of shorter journeys with a recharge in between and 500 miles starts to look realistic.

As ever, ignore official test results, they're meaningless in the real world.
The spec is available in the online manual.
It’s 45l plus 7l reserve.

https://www.seat.com/owners/my-seat...3&chapter=datos_tecnicos&module=X-61XR0W7R8SP
 
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corbu33

Active Member
Oct 24, 2020
39
6
As I understood it has a big downside in my opinion. If battery is empty you lost completly the electric engine so you do not have anymore a 204 BHP car, which I do not like that my power depends if I can recharge it or not. Of course I am speaking from the point of view that I do not own a house in order to be easier to recharge each day but even so... if I drive long distances on motorways with 130+ km/h... you will ran out of battery fast... so I do not want that my max power being so dependant.
 

vc-10

Active Member
Mar 29, 2016
293
104
The car keeps a 'buffer' in the battery. The battery also recharges whenever you brake. If you run it flat in EV mode, the petrol starts up and can also charge the battery.
 

corbu33

Active Member
Oct 24, 2020
39
6
So what you are saying is that, I have 204 BHP non stop, even with a depeleted battery, because on the highway there is very few regeneartion going on for example. The dealer told me that when battery is empty bye bye 204bhp, so recharging is needed. Your claim can be checked somewhere or is your personal opinion ? Thx
 

vc-10

Active Member
Mar 29, 2016
293
104
The battery is never empty. There's always a buffer of a few percent, which is all you need for instant acceleration. At constant highway speeds with the petrol engine on, the electric motor isn't being used.
 

corbu33

Active Member
Oct 24, 2020
39
6
So again my question... do you always have "all 204 BHP in Leon case" available ? even on the highway if I needed or anywhere else but having the battery depleted. My dealer informed me that this is not the case, if battery is depleted you need to recharge before you can have again the benefit of the electric motor as well.
Bit confused I have to say and I do not find this info anywhere. Because if this is the case I would buy a PHEV instant ... even the price is much better than 190 tsi, because it is subsidized.
 

C_ED_99

Active Member
Jan 27, 2010
213
13
Cumbria
Completely depleting a Li battery is really bad for them, so it will likely have a 1-2 kWh reserve. None of the marketing materials tell you though. The alternator will be able to recharge the battery while driving at highway speeds
 

vc-10

Active Member
Mar 29, 2016
293
104
A lot of hybrid/EV cars have larger capacity batteries than the 'book' value. For example, the VW ID.3 has a 58kwh battery. But that's the useable amount- the actual battery itself is (IIRC) 64kwh.

The same thing happens with your phone- when it gets to 0% and turns itself off, there is still charge in the battery- perhaps 5% of the total charge available.
 
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