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Tuning Chip for 1.6tdi

weatherlight

Guest
If you dont want to risk warranty your best bet will still be to lighten up the car and get low rolling resistance tires mate. If you already have RRL, no spare wheel and light carpet mats, there isnt much you can do though :( . 15" lightweight alloy or steel wheels offered around %2 savings in a test done with golf mk6 compared to 16" alloy (195/65 15 vs 205/55 16). If you dont have LRR tires you may consider both the wheel and tires for up to %6-7 performance gains (although engine output will remain the same, you will gain 6-7 hp at wheels on a dyno, you can test it and power at the wheels is the real deal)

Since your main concern is performance, cost of wheels + tires is probably logical for a 6-7 hp upgrade
 

Ckpearce91

Active Member
Feb 20, 2013
1,283
6
Milton Keynes
If you dont want to risk warranty your best bet will still be to lighten up the car and get low rolling resistance tires mate. If you already have RRL, no spare wheel and light carpet mats, there isnt much you can do though :( . 15" lightweight alloy or steel wheels offered around %2 savings in a test done with golf mk6 compared to 16" alloy (195/65 15 vs 205/55 16). If you dont have LRR tires you may consider both the wheel and tires for up to %6-7 performance gains (although engine output will remain the same, you will gain 6-7 hp at wheels on a dyno, you can test it and power at the wheels is the real deal)

Since your main concern is performance, cost of wheels + tires is probably logical for a 6-7 hp upgrade
My main concern is not performance as I've said before, I was just intrigued by the chip. I'm not going to change my wheels to crappy steels for an extra 6 hp, if I wanted a basic looking Leon, I would of gone for the S not the SE
 
Jun 15, 2013
268
2
get low rolling resistance tires mate
weatherlight

I and others have told you several times before, all UK Leons with 15" and 16" wheels come with low rolling resistance tyres as standard. The OP would be wasting his money for no gain.

no spare wheel and light carpet mats,

Lightening the car by fitting lighter mats and removing the spare (not fitted as standard) will do nothing for performance or economy, the weight saving is simply to small. You would save as much weight by leaving your shoes at home instead of fitting lightweight mats.


you will gain 6-7 hp at wheels on a dyno,
No you will not. Weight saving will improve your power to weight ratio. LRR tyres will not show on a Rolling Road test at all.

The only thing a rolling road test would do is ighten the OP's wallet.

Since your main concern is performance, cost of wheels + tires is probably logical for a 6-7 hp upgrade
The OP has said several time its economy not performance he is interested in, please read his posts.

OP. If you want to get better fuel economy simply drive better. You don't have to drive slower, just anticipate the road well ahead. Two examples, get off the power earlier before lights and stick to 70 mph on motorways. It costs nothing and can make quiet a difference.

Your car is new, the economy will improve as the car beds in. Diesels are noted for this more than petrols. My wifes Ceed diesel has now covered 30,000 miles and in virtually identical use its doing about 4 mpg more than it did when new, that 8%.
 

Ckpearce91

Active Member
Feb 20, 2013
1,283
6
Milton Keynes
weatherlight

I and others have told you several times before, all UK Leons with 15" and 16" wheels come with low rolling resistance tyres as standard. The OP would be wasting his money for no gain.




Lightening the car by fitting lighter mats and removing the spare (not fitted as standard) will do nothing for performance or economy, the weight saving is simply to small. You would save as much weight by leaving your shoes at home instead of fitting lightweight mats.




No you will not. Weight saving will improve your power to weight ratio. LRR tyres will not show on a Rolling Road test at all.

The only thing a rolling road test would do is ighten the OP's wallet.



The OP has said several time its economy not performance he is interested in, please read his posts.

OP. If you want to get better fuel economy simply drive better. You don't have to drive slower, just anticipate the road well ahead. Two examples, get off the power earlier before lights and stick to 70 mph on motorways. It costs nothing and can make quiet a difference.

Your car is new, the economy will improve as the car beds in. Diesels are noted for this more than petrols. My wifes Ceed diesel has now covered 30,000 miles and in virtually identical use its doing about 4 mpg more than it did when new, that 8%.
Firstly, thanks for reading my posts and telling him what's what because its getting annoying now that he's obviously not reading my replies.


I use cruise control at 70 on the motorway because I want to save fuel. And I use engine braking to slow down because apparently it's better for fuel economy?

How long does it take for the car to bed in?
And living in Milton Keynes probably affects my FE because of the constant build up to 60/70 mph and then dropping back down to nothing for the next round about. I don't know if you've ever been to MK but its basically a town that consists of dual carriageways and roundabouts!
 
Jun 15, 2013
268
2
How long does it take for the car to bed in?
2 examples. I have used the same time period each year because winter diesel and cold weather can bring your mpg down quite considerably thus the figures are directly comparable. The mileage covered will be approx. 3000 over each sample and the use will be normal for the time of year i.e. commuting, shopping, visiting relatives but no holidays. We only use Asda and Tesco diesel.

Wifes 1.6 CRDi Kia Ceed.

0 - 3000 miles (Oct 2010 to Jan 2011) 49.1 mpg
10000 - 13000 miles (Oct 2011 to Jan 2012) 50.1 mpg
20000 - 23000 miles (Oct 2012 to Jan 2013) 51.3 mpg

My old BMW 118D

0 - 3000 miles (March 2008 - July 2008) 47.57 mpg
7000- 10000 miles (March 2009 - July 2009) 48.02 mpg
14500 - 17500 miles (March 2010 - July 2010) 48.43 mpg
21000 - 24000 miles (March 2011 - July 2011) 49.34 mpg

As you can see the improvement over the first 23000 miles in the Ceed was almost 4.5%, the BMW 3.7%.

In the period March - July 2012 I only covered 2000 miles in the BMW thus its not a fair comparison, the trips were on average shorter. For the record the mpg was 47.85. This year I sold the car in mid June thus again its not a fair comparison, for the record the mpg over 1800 miles was 48.69.
 

dw911

Active Member
Mar 30, 2013
1,038
4
I use cruise control at 70 on the motorway because I want to save fuel. And I use engine braking to slow down because apparently it's better for fuel economy?
That's correct, whilst engine braking the ecu shuts off the fuel supply to the engine
 
Aug 16, 2007
666
0
Wolverhampton
I once managed to get 58.9mpg out of my non-eco Mk2, I stuck LRR tyres on it and did all of the things below.

Turn everything off (no air-con, not even the cabin fan)
Pump the tyres up 2-3psi over the recommendation
Keep your car well maintained (keep to oil change interval and use good oil)
Take all unnecessary weight out of the car
Do not rev over 2000rpm (change up as easy as possible without labouring the engine)
Anticipate slowing / stopping traffic (leave a good gap between you are the car in front)
Try not to use your brakes (ease off well before islands, junctions etc but stay in gear)

Ask yourself a question. If you drive at the 60mph limit on a single carriageway, do you find yourself catching people up who drive at less than 60mph? The answer will likely be yes. So why not drive at 50 or 55mph instead?

Loads of eco driving tips, but it's a waiting game I'm afraid. I didn't see my best economy figures until after 30k.
 

Ckpearce91

Active Member
Feb 20, 2013
1,283
6
Milton Keynes
I once managed to get 58.9mpg out of my non-eco Mk2, I stuck LRR tyres on it and did all of the things below.

Turn everything off (no air-con, not even the cabin fan)
Pump the tyres up 2-3psi over the recommendation
Keep your car well maintained (keep to oil change interval and use good oil)
Take all unnecessary weight out of the car
Do not rev over 2000rpm (change up as easy as possible without labouring the engine)
Anticipate slowing / stopping traffic (leave a good gap between you are the car in front)
Try not to use your brakes (ease off well before islands, junctions etc but stay in gear)

Ask yourself a question. If you drive at the 60mph limit on a single carriageway, do you find yourself catching people up who drive at less than 60mph? The answer will likely be yes. So why not drive at 50 or 55mph instead?

Loads of eco driving tips, but it's a waiting game I'm afraid. I didn't see my best economy figures until after 30k.
My PCP mileage limit is 30k so I don't think I'll experience the best fuel economy lol. And I know I've said about fuel economy on here but that doesn't mean I don't like driving to speed limits, I'm not gonna be the slow arse on the road in Milton Keynes. I don't really catch up to people going slower because most people in mk drive to the speed limits. But I do anticipate the road ahead and slow down accordingly using engine braking.
 

Ckpearce91

Active Member
Feb 20, 2013
1,283
6
Milton Keynes
I once managed to get 58.9mpg out of my non-eco Mk2, I stuck LRR tyres on it and did all of the things below.

Turn everything off (no air-con, not even the cabin fan)
Pump the tyres up 2-3psi over the recommendation
Keep your car well maintained (keep to oil change interval and use good oil)
Take all unnecessary weight out of the car
Do not rev over 2000rpm (change up as easy as possible without labouring the engine)
Anticipate slowing / stopping traffic (leave a good gap between you are the car in front)
Try not to use your brakes (ease off well before islands, junctions etc but stay in gear)

Ask yourself a question. If you drive at the 60mph limit on a single carriageway, do you find yourself catching people up who drive at less than 60mph? The answer will likely be yes. So why not drive at 50 or 55mph instead?

Loads of eco driving tips, but it's a waiting game I'm afraid. I didn't see my best economy figures until after 30k.
My PCP mileage limit is 30k so I don't think I'll experience the best fuel economy lol. And I know I've said about fuel economy on here but that doesn't mean I don't like driving to speed limits, I'm not gonna be the slow arse on the road in Milton Keynes. I don't really catch up to people going slower because most people in mk drive to the speed limits. But I do anticipate the road ahead and slow down accordingly using engine braking.
 

weatherlight

Guest
I thought I read chip tuning and assumed you wanted more power (they dont give much FE with new cars), sorry for the annoyance.

Lighter cars have better performance and FE, period. Heavy rubber mats + spare wheel can weight as much as 20+ kgs. A 10 percent decrease in a vehicle's weight roughly equates to around 5% FE on most compact cars, 20kg kg saving can offer +0.5 mpg FE in a Leon.

LLR tires provide up to 40% less rolling resistance. A dyno measures the power at the wheels first then measures the resistances and calculates hp loss of the drivetrain (includes rolling resistance). Then it adds that loss to wheel power giving you engine power. Once you have less resistance tires, power lost at drivetrain decrease. Since your motor output is the same, you will gain hp at the wheels. Since power at the wheels is what actually pushes the car forward, you actually gain those HP and you car accelerates better.

Since you have those already, only FE you can gain is from your driving technique like coggie mentioned.
 
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