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Loss of power and oil consumption

Robot

Active Member
Sep 21, 2016
22
2
I have a Seat Leon mk1 2001, 1.6SR engine.
I got two problems, I don't know if they're connected or not.

Firstly, it consumes oil, around 1 - 1.1 litre per 1000 kilometers. I guess that is around 0.22-0.24 gallon per 621 miles..?
I've tried to check if there's any drops of oil under the car but I haven't seen any.
Where should I start to check this?

Secondly, it loses power while driving and the rpm goes up and down while idling when it's warm. The loss of power is most noticable when driving over 100 km/h and especially uphill. But even when driving slower it has started to occur.

I got an error code:
00537 - Lambda (Oxygen Sensor) Regulation: Upper Limit

I've gotten the Lambda/oxygen sensor replaced and checked for error codes and it was still there. I removed the error code, checked again and it was gone. Then I went for a test drive but the problems were still there. The change didn't make it any better, now after a few days it even seems worse. It happens more often while driving slowly. It stutters and lose power. Almost like it's going to stop. The error code came back after the first test drive.

What can it be? Where should I start to troubleshoot this?
I'm not experienced with mechanics, I can do some things myself if I have the tools and it can be done outside without going under the car.
What does Upper Limit mean in the error code?

I have checked the air filter and it was dusty and I guess I should change it anyway. But it wasn't extremely dirty. I looked at the MAF sensor at the same time and it looked clean, not any dirt at all.

Help would be much appreciated! Love this car and really want to get it to work well.
 

mty12345

Active Member
Jun 17, 2011
3,196
208
bristol
Hi mate.
The 1.6 engine isn't very common in these cars, so i don't think many people on here have that much experience with them, but the good news is that being as it's not as complicated as the 1.8t, then it should be easy enough for you to do some checks yourself even if you haven't got much experience with mechanics yet.

I heard before that the 1.6 can use a lot of oil, so it could be related, but i think they are probably 2 seperate issues. The first thing to do is look up your code on ross tech http://wiki.ross-tech.com/wiki/index.php/00537
They are always the best place to look up any codes you have.

As you can see there are a few possible reasons for 00537, but it basically means that the balance between air and fuel has gone over a certain limit. In the case of 'upper limit' it means that the engine is getting too much air or not enough fuel.

The most likely reason for that is you may have an intake or vaccum leak. That would also lose power and cause you to have rough idle with RPM moving up and down like you described.

Get a good flashlight and maybe a small mirror like this https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Small-Te...lumbers-etc-/181959526538?hash=item2a5da2088a Then when the engine is cold, have a good look in the engine bay for any pipes that may have split. Get right in there and have a good feel about, make sure to give the pipes a gentle squeeze as sometimes you can have a big split and not be able to see it until you squeeze the pipe a bit. Use the mirror to help you look underneath the pipes and into any areas you can't see.

If you have no leaks, then the next thing you want to do is view the 'fuel trims'. That will help narrow down the problem.
Your options for viewing them are.
1. VCDS (expensive, but a good option if you plan to keep the car for a long time)
2. OBD2 reader, (something like this) https://www.gendan.co.uk/product_FXNT200.html
3. Elm327 OBD2 dongle and the android 'torque app'

Like i say start with checking for leaks and let us know how you get on. Once you are sure there are no leaks, then if you post again I will explain what to look for on your fuel trims and help you some more with it.
 
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Robot

Active Member
Sep 21, 2016
22
2
Hi!

Yes, I rarely see any info about Leons with this engine, I'm glad to hear they are less complicated though. :)

I had no idea what ”upper limit” meant, great to get that explained and I will start with looking at the pipes in the engine bay. It will probably take me a few days until I can start doing that. I would have started today, Sunday, but it's been raining and right now it's snowing also.

Nice tip with the mirror, I'll see if I can find any.

Thanks for the links and info about error readers, that OBD2 reader looked interesting. I've got a VAG KKL cable and I've downloaded the free VCDS-Lite, I guess it will do for now.

Thanks again for taking the time and explaining in detail, making it understandable for a newbie such as me. Much appreciated!
 

mty12345

Active Member
Jun 17, 2011
3,196
208
bristol
No worries mate, i'm glad it all made sense,lol. Yeah VCDS lite will do fine for looking at the fuel trims if needed, let me know how you get on when the weather improves and you get chance to have a look. Good luck.
 
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Robot

Active Member
Sep 21, 2016
22
2
I was able to do a quick check yesterday and I found two hoses where the ends had started to split up. One goes from the top of the engine to a connector and it connects to the next broken one. It goes to what I think is the brake servo. When I had the engine on I could actually hear the hissing noise from that one.
So, are those the leaks I'm looking for? I'll change the hoses anyway, but maybe I should look around more in the engine bay, I haven't gotten any mirror yet to see those tricky places.

I also got a tip about PCV, crankcase ventilation. I was told it could also cause air and/or oil leaks. After some googling I managed to figure out where it's located and how it looks like. When I took away the engine covers yesterday I could see it looked wet and dirty around where it's located.
So, I suspect that might be part of both the problems.

Attaching pictures of both the broken hoses and the PCV.


01.jpg
02.jpg
 

mty12345

Active Member
Jun 17, 2011
3,196
208
bristol
Yeah mate, that was exactly the kind of thing you were looking for! :) A big leak on the brake booster pipe would definitely cause a rough idle and almost certainly that code too. The engine will be breathing in air which it hasn't measured through that split and that will be the cause of the issue.
I'd definitely replace that, and the PCV too if it looks like it's leaking. The brakes will still work fine with that kind of issue, but you may find you need a lot more pressure on the pedal to get the same amount of braking effect.

I would still look round the engine bay for leaks as these cars are getting old now and it's common to find more than one pipe split.
 
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Maria

my mid-life crisis car
Jun 22, 2016
117
12
South-West
I now have a 1.6 too, we can be the exclusive 1.6 club lol

Regardless of whether the two issues are linked or not in this case, you're wise to suspect they could be. Loss of any type of oil and power and/or peculiar idling are very often connected and sometimes in really strange ways. Just to give you two examples, a turbo seal gone eventually leading to running on because of oil getting sucked into the engine, and an automatic losing drive and fast idling also eventually running on that turns out to be a hole in the kick-down vacuum diaphragm ... not an auto box rebuild just a few quid part and 10 minutes to fit it.
 

Robot

Active Member
Sep 21, 2016
22
2
I now have a 1.6 too, we can be the exclusive 1.6 club lol

Regardless of whether the two issues are linked or not in this case, you're wise to suspect they could be. Loss of any type of oil and power and/or peculiar idling are very often connected and sometimes in really strange ways. Just to give you two examples, a turbo seal gone eventually leading to running on because of oil getting sucked into the engine, and an automatic losing drive and fast idling also eventually running on that turns out to be a hole in the kick-down vacuum diaphragm ... not an auto box rebuild just a few quid part and 10 minutes to fit it.
I'm happy to be a part of a nice exclusive club! :)
It really is difficult to figure out what's causing different issues, and then finding the right parts is a jungle some times. Especially for newbie like me. But I'm glad there's a forum to ask and find out :)
 

Robot

Active Member
Sep 21, 2016
22
2
I've been looking more at leaks and at the PCV today and found what might be another leak.
From the hose/pipe from the air filter there is a small pipe going to the PCV and it seems like it might be a small hole in the ”accordion” like part of that pipe.

I've been looking around for the spare parts: the PCV, the hose/pipe from the brake servo to the engine and the pipe from air filter to PCV.
But I've ran into some problems finding the correct parts.

1. The hose from the brake servo, should it be with a non-return valve? Should it be for mechanical throttle or electric throttle control?

2. The air filter pipe. I can't find that smaller pipe as a replacement part, only the big air filter pipe with the smaller on it. In my car there is a electric connector on it, for what I guess is some sort of sensor. I can't find that kind except for in some original parts shop where it is too expensive.
Is that smaller pipe removable from the bigger? And what would be the part nr. to replace it with? Or can I replace it with any hose that would fit? I'm attaching a pic so you can see which part I mean.

3. How do I remove the PCV?

Thanks again for the help!


01.jpg

02.jpg
 
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Maria

my mid-life crisis car
Jun 22, 2016
117
12
South-West
I'm happy to be a part of a nice exclusive club! :)
It really is difficult to figure out what's causing different issues, and then finding the right parts is a jungle some times. Especially for newbie like me. But I'm glad there's a forum to ask and find out :)
As there's no Haynes for these, I've found it absolutely invaluable. That said I'm much less keen to do things myself these days and much more prepared to pay someone, but still the customer from hell who knows a little and then bangs on about the good old days of points, SU carbs and kingpins.
 
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mty12345

Active Member
Jun 17, 2011
3,196
208
bristol
I've been looking more at leaks and at the PCV today and found what might be another leak.
From the hose/pipe from the air filter there is a small pipe going to the PCV and it seems like it might be a small hole in the ”accordion” like part of that pipe.

I've been looking around for the spare parts: the PCV, the hose/pipe from the brake servo to the engine and the pipe from air filter to PCV.
But I've ran into some problems finding the correct parts.

1. The hose from the brake servo, should it be with a non-return valve? Should it be for mechanical throttle or electric throttle control?

2. The air filter pipe. I can't find that smaller pipe as a replacement part, only the big air filter pipe with the smaller on it. In my car there is a electric connector on it, for what I guess is some sort of sensor. I can't find that kind except for in some original parts shop where it is too expensive.
Is that smaller pipe removable from the bigger? And what would be the part nr. to replace it with? Or can I replace it with any hose that would fit? I'm attaching a pic so you can see which part I mean.

3. How do I remove the PCV?

Thanks again for the help!
Hi again mate. To help solve all these problems you will need to look at your engine to find the 3 letter identification code. For example mine is AUQ. I'm not exactly sure where it is on the 1.6 but if you look around the top or possibly even the side of the engine, you should be able to find it easily enough. Here is an example of what you are looking for.




Once you have found that you will be able to use this site to help you indentify which parts you need. http://www.oemepc.com/seat/parts_ls...001/hg/1/catalog/se/drive_standart/205/lang/e

I would also be 99% certain that your engine was also used in one of the VW golfs from around that time, once you find that engine code you will probably find that one of these two haynes manuals covers your engine.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Volkswagen-Petrol-1998-2000-Service-manuals/dp/1859607276
or
https://www.halfords.com/tools/gara...nes-vw-golf-and-bora-01-03-manual-597468.html

In the mean time
1. The non-return valve is the big black disc shaped thing that the split pipe on your brake servo is connecting to, you shouldn't need to replace that as well, just the pipe should be fine. Not sure if it's electronic or mechanical on your car. Finding the engine code may help decide, but if not you could have a look at the gas pedal and see if you have a cable that connects it to the engine (mechanical) or two electronic sensors (electronic).

2. Engine code should answer that too, although if the hole is very small you could maybe use some aluminum tape or similar.

3. Again once, when you have the engine code, hopefully the haynes manual should answer that. If not then if you give me the engine code i can look it up on a thing called Elsawin for you.
 
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Robot

Active Member
Sep 21, 2016
22
2
Thanks mate for all the helpful advice :worship: The engine code is AKL.

1. I've been looking around oemepc.com, very useful site!
It doesn't say the engine code for hose (intake manifold to brake servo). Though it does give the PR-codes for many. Also been looking at shops like autodoc. The only hose I've found where it's said it fits AKL is Vaico V10-3607, 1J0612041BB, says it fits with car with electric throttle. It's the whole hose with the non-return valve.
I tried to look at the gas pedal but I couldn't see any cable or sensors, so can't say if it's mechanical or electronic.
Probably other hoses would fit also, but it's the connector to the engine that worries me. Dont know if it's a standard fit for most engines or not. Anyway, might just get that Vaico hose.

2. I was also thinking about using some tape to cover the hole, it's small. Though can't really say if there is more holes since it's ”accordion” style. (Don't know the correct word for that :) ) But maybe clean it and put on some tape until I can find a replacement. Was thinking of some repair/vulcanising/silicon tape, I didn't know about the aluminum tape. Have to take a look at that. I guess it has to be able to handle high temp?

3. I looked at workshop-manuals (for Golf IV) and it says:
Breather housing - To remove: remove cylinder head cover → Item, release ends of springs and turn breather housing to the left.”
I'm not sure if that is the AKL engine but it do look like it. But if that's the case, it seems like I have to remove cylinder head cover to get to the PCV?

I'm going to see if I can find any Haynes manual for Golf nearby, would be great if this engine is covered also.
I've also asked SEAT if I could get the PR-codes for this car, it sounded like they might send them to me. Might be useful anway. EDIT: Nope, they couldn't find any info about PR-codes. Maybe should ask local dealer/garage.
 
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Robot

Active Member
Sep 21, 2016
22
2
As there's no Haynes for these, I've found it absolutely invaluable. That said I'm much less keen to do things myself these days and much more prepared to pay someone, but still the customer from hell who knows a little and then bangs on about the good old days of points, SU carbs and kingpins.
Yeah, it would be super if there was a Haynes manual for these cars as well. Would make things a bit easier. :)
 

mty12345

Active Member
Jun 17, 2011
3,196
208
bristol
Thanks mate for all the helpful advice :worship: The engine code is AKL.

1. I've been looking around oemepc.com, very useful site!
It doesn't say the engine code for hose (intake manifold to brake servo). Though it does give the PR-codes for many. Also been looking at shops like autodoc. The only hose I've found where it's said it fits AKL is Vaico V10-3607, 1J0612041BB, says it fits with car with electric throttle. It's the whole hose with the non-return valve.
I tried to look at the gas pedal but I couldn't see any cable or sensors, so can't say if it's mechanical or electronic.
Probably other hoses would fit also, but it's the connector to the engine that worries me. Dont know if it's a standard fit for most engines or not. Anyway, might just get that Vaico hose.

2. I was also thinking about using some tape to cover the hole, it's small. Though can't really say if there is more holes since it's ”accordion” style. (Don't know the correct word for that :) ) But maybe clean it and put on some tape until I can find a replacement. Was thinking of some repair/vulcanising/silicon tape, I didn't know about the aluminum tape. Have to take a look at that. I guess it has to be able to handle high temp?

3. I looked at workshop-manuals (for Golf IV) and it says:
Breather housing - To remove: remove cylinder head cover → Item, release ends of springs and turn breather housing to the left.”
I'm not sure if that is the AKL engine but it do look like it. But if that's the case, it seems like I have to remove cylinder head cover to get to the PCV?

I'm going to see if I can find any Haynes manual for Golf nearby, would be great if this engine is covered also.
I've also asked SEAT if I could get the PR-codes for this car, it sounded like they might send them to me. Might be useful anway. EDIT: Nope, they couldn't find any info about PR-codes. Maybe should ask local dealer/garage.
Hi again mate. No worries for the help, it's not a problem. :)

First off the AKL engine is covered by the blue haynes manual, which is the same one as i have. https://www.eurocarparts.com/p/hayn...MIwrvOjMvD6QIVnIBQBh3E2A2tEAQYASABEgKQX_D_BwE



akl.png


1. The hanyes manual isn't clear about the type of throttle, although looking at AKL engines and AKL throttle bodies on google, they all seem to have mechanical cables rather than being electronic. So i'd be 99% sure yours is mechanical. If so then obviously that part probably isn't suitable.

I've had a look at the haynes and it seems the pipe just pushes on in the normal way even though your manifold is plastic.
akl4.png


If you need to save money and the pipe is the same diameter at the engine and at the check valve, then you could probably get away with using any vacuum pipe and using clamps to secure it in place. (don't over tighten the manifold end or you could crack the manifold) However as it is your brakes, I think you would probably be best relacing the whole pipe, check valve included, just to be extra sure that it's safe.
It is very confusing with all the PR numbers, and I guess there are also different pipes for left and right hand drive vehicles too.
The best thing to do would probably be to email hortons who are a sponsor of this site. They are great, and can usually find which part you need if you send them the VIN number. https://www.seatpartsshop.co.uk/pages/request-a-part-or-accessory. I'm not 100% sure they are open atm with all the coronavirus etc, but it's worth a try. They can post you the part if so.

If they can't help, then your local seat dealer should be able to do the same thing.



2. Yes i think accordian is the best way to describe it, it makes sense to me. I was saying aluminum tape due to the fact it could get hot, but it's probably not too hot there anyway, so repair/vulcanising/silcon tape will probably be fine. I think the brake pipe will be causing 99% of your problems, so you could replace that first and then replace the PCV parts at a later date when you have the money.

3. I looked it up in the manual, and it seems you can just undo the clip (squeeze the tabs together with pliers and then it will slide) and then the whole thing twists off.
akl2.png
 
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Robot

Active Member
Sep 21, 2016
22
2
Hi again mate. No worries for the help, it's not a problem. :)

First off the AKL engine is covered by the blue haynes manual, which is the same one as i have. https://www.eurocarparts.com/p/hayn...MIwrvOjMvD6QIVnIBQBh3E2A2tEAQYASABEgKQX_D_BwE



View attachment 15048

1. The hanyes manual isn't clear about the type of throttle, although looking at AKL engines and AKL throttle bodies on google, they all seem to have mechanical cables rather than being electronic. So i'd be 99% sure yours is mechanical. If so then obviously that part probably isn't suitable.

I've had a look at the haynes and it seems the pipe just pushes on in the normal way even though your manifold is plastic. View attachment 15051

If you need to save money and the pipe is the same diameter at the engine and at the check valve, then you could probably get away with using any vacuum pipe and using clamps to secure it in place. (don't over tighten the manifold end or you could crack the manifold) However as it is your brakes, I think you would probably be best relacing the whole pipe, check valve included, just to be extra sure that it's safe.
It is very confusing with all the PR numbers, and I guess there are also different pipes for left and right hand drive vehicles too.
The best thing to do would probably be to email hortons who are a sponsor of this site. They are great, and can usually find which part you need if you send them the VIN number. https://www.seatpartsshop.co.uk/pages/request-a-part-or-accessory. I'm not 100% sure they are open atm with all the coronavirus etc, but it's worth a try. They can post you the part if so.

If they can't help, then your local seat dealer should be able to do the same thing.



2. Yes i think accordian is the best way to describe it, it makes sense to me. I was saying aluminum tape due to the fact it could get hot, but it's probably not too hot there anyway, so repair/vulcanising/silcon tape will probably be fine. I think the brake pipe will be causing 99% of your problems, so you could replace that first and then replace the PCV parts at a later date when you have the money.

3. I looked it up in the manual, and it seems you can just undo the clip (squeeze the tabs together with pliers and then it will slide) and then the whole thing twists off. View attachment 15050

Thanks mate, I really should get that Haynes manual!

1. I also was thinking that, since it's the brakes it's better to replace the whole thing. I've sent a message to hortons, just have to wait and see when they answer. Why does it matter what kind of throttle the engine has when changing the brake servo hose?

2. Tape it will be :thumbup:

3. That sounds good.

Ok, I'll order the parts when I have found out which is the correct hose. Then I'll update here how things goes.
Thanks! :)
 

Maria

my mid-life crisis car
Jun 22, 2016
117
12
South-West
Hi again mate. No worries for the help, it's not a problem. :)

First off the AKL engine is covered by the blue haynes manual, which is the same one as i have. https://www.eurocarparts.com/p/hayn...MIwrvOjMvD6QIVnIBQBh3E2A2tEAQYASABEgKQX_D_BwE
Is the engine code in the engine number on the V5 do you know?
My car is at the garage but I ordered the wrong sump, I don't want to get another wrong one but obviously don't have the car here to look. And I'll be waiting for the sump to come from Germany.
The engine number shown on my V5 is ASV then 6 numeric digits.
 

Robot

Active Member
Sep 21, 2016
22
2
Is the engine code in the engine number on the V5 do you know?
My car is at the garage but I ordered the wrong sump, I don't want to get another wrong one but obviously don't have the car here to look. And I'll be waiting for the sump to come from Germany.
The engine number shown on my V5 is ASV then 6 numeric digits.
The 6 digits should be the engine serial number as far as I know. Though I have no knowledge of the V5.
 

mty12345

Active Member
Jun 17, 2011
3,196
208
bristol
1. Why does it matter what kind of throttle the engine has when changing the brake servo hose?

Ok, I'll order the parts when I have found out which is the correct hose. Then I'll update here how things goes.
Thanks! :)
I'm not sure why tbh buddy. Maybe it has a different connection on the inlet manifold, or maybe it's just a slightly different length/angle where the brake pipe goes past the throttle body.

Yeah keep up updated as to how you get on, i'll keep my fingers crossed Hortons can get it for you.
 
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