Seat Exeo EGR Replacement

Seat Exeo Paddy

Active Member
Jan 15, 2017
9
0
Hi all,

The check engine light came on recently in my 2012 reg seat exeo, 2.0 litre diesel.
I took it to the local mechanic and he told me the EGR was done, and i would need a new one.
He quoted a price in the region of 600 - 700 quid, which is a little steep for me at the minute.
Does anyone on here have any experience in changing an EGR valve in this type of car, or do you know if the egr and the cooler must be changed together, or if the EGR can be replaced on its own, whilst keeping original cooler. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
P.S. the engine code of my car is : CJCA.

Thanks guys.
 

XPtuning

Active Member
Mar 29, 2013
38
0
Typical dealership solution.
I would say; removed it and clean it up and put back in. Use a small copper brush.
Check the piping from and to the egr as well.

 
Last edited:

jambo1979

Active Member
Jul 20, 2017
3
0
Thanks very much for your reply XPtuning.

I will give that a try and see if it works.

Thanks again :coolthumb
Hi Paddy,

Did you manage to clean the egr yourself?

If so could you do so without removing or draining the cooler?

I have the same engine as you so the video in the post does not relate to the same setup.
 

Seat Exeo Paddy

Active Member
Jan 15, 2017
9
0
Hi Paddy,

Did you manage to clean the egr yourself?

If so could you do so without removing or draining the cooler?

I have the same engine as you so the video in the post does not relate to the same setup.
Hi Jambo,

Apparently it is not a success to clean our EGR type because it is virtually impossible to get into all the parts and components that need to be cleaned. And even if you do clean them, the electronics that work the solenoid within the EGR will more than likely be damaged from all the heat its been exposed to. My car had 140 thousand miles on the clock back in February, and apparently that is a common fault that occurs with the egr around that mileage.

So my 2 options were: either to bite the bullet and get a new egr fitted, or bypass the egr altogether.

I ended up getting my EGR bypassed. I took it to my local car electronics guy and he programmed the engine to keep the EGR closed all the time. So the egr is still there, but its basically doing nothing. I was a little bit worried about getting it done, because I've heard that it can clog your dpf up in a short time without a fuctional egr.
However, thats almost a year ago, and with just over 24,000 miles on the clock since then, all I can say is, I'm mad I didnt get it done sooner. The car runs much smoother, I've got much better throttle response, i've got a slight bit more power, and its much easier on diesel. I'm getting an extra 8 miles to the gallon.

The DPF still regenerates like it always did, so that end of things has stayed the same.

The cost to get the job done was €180, so it was much less than the price for a new egr. And I've probably saved multiples of that in diesel money since.

Now the only thing I'm still a little sceptical about is my cars NCT. Its due on 28th of January, and I'm hoping they don't fail for a non functional EGR.
The electronics guy that done the job for me, told me that I had absolutely nothing to worry about, and that he's done more than100 cars like this before and they've passed both NCT and MOT tests.

I will let you know if there are problems getting it through the emissions test at the NCT, but I don't think there will be.

Hope this helps you out a little 👍
 
Last edited:

jambo1979

Active Member
Jul 20, 2017
3
0
Paddy,

Thanks for the response, eek was hopeful the EGR could be cleaned, let's hope its not a bugger to replace myself as I am hoping to sell the car so bypassing isn't really an option for me!

Hi Jambo,

Apparently it is not a success to clean our EGR type because it is virtually impossible to get into all the parts and components that need to be cleaned. And even if you do clean them, the electronics that work the solenoid within the EGR will more than likely be damaged from all the heat its been exposed to. My car had 140 thousand miles on the clock back in February, and apparently that is a common fault that occurs with the egr around that mileage.

So my 2 options were: either to bite the bullet and get a new egr fitted, or bypass the egr altogether.

I ended up getting my EGR bypassed. I took it to my local car electronics guy and he programmed the engine to keep the EGR closed all the time. So the egr is still there, but its basically doing nothing. I was a little bit worried about getting it done, because I've heard that it can clog your dpf up in a short time without a fuctional egr.
However, thats almost a year ago, and with just over 24,000 miles on the clock since then, all I can say is, I'm mad I didnt get it done sooner. The car runs much smoother, I've got much better throttle response, i've got a slight bit more power, and its much easier on diesel. I'm getting an extra 8 miles to the gallon.

The DPF still regenerates like it always did, so that end of things has stayed the same.

The cost to get the job done was €180, so it was much less than the price for a new egr. And I've probably saved multiples of that in diesel money since.

Now the only thing I'm still a little sceptical about is my cars NCT. Its due on 28th of January, and I'm hoping they don't fail for a non functional EGR.
The electronics guy that done the job for me, told me that I had absolutely nothing to worry about, and that he's done more than100 cars like this before and they've passed both NCT and MOT tests.

I will let you know if there are problems getting it through the emissions test at the NCT, but I don't think there will be.

Hope this helps you out a little 👍
 
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