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Sub 8 and TTS disc comparability?

Tara

Active Member
Jan 21, 2008
400
94
Bournemouth
Does anyone know if these 2 discs are exactly the same ? I've read they are and if you look closely you will see an Audi stamp but do they just use different part numbers , thanks in advance as I was thinking of getting a set for spare as I've already had mine reskimmed once and they are pretty reasonable and easier to find than my ones.
 

Tara

Active Member
Jan 21, 2008
400
94
Bournemouth
On the Tarox website they both share the same part number and all the specs are the same apart from one the disc height offset which is 49.5 on the Audi and 50.5 on the Leon.
 

Oldbutswift

Active Member
Mar 23, 2016
285
90
Not the same I thought on diameter?

370mm on the Seat and 340mm on the TTS?

Which is why you can fit Audi approved 17" wheels on the TTS but you struggle to get even 18" ones on a Seat with the Brembos...except for TD pro race and OZ Ultrleggera...and others perhaps as yet unknown!

Edit.
Might be just the different brakes that make the difference,but the discs on my daughter's TTS look different to the Brembos on my Carbon.
 
Last edited:

Damo H

Carbon Snob
Staff member
Moderator
Oct 3, 2012
3,809
2,245
Car Length In Front
Original title says TTS.

TTRS has 370mm, older model has the 4 pots like the Carbon, R and Performance pack cars.

Newer TTRS has 8 pots.
 

Tara

Active Member
Jan 21, 2008
400
94
Bournemouth
Original title says TTS.

TTRS has 370mm, older model has the 4 pots like the Carbon, R and Performance pack cars.

Newer TTRS has 8 pots.
My mistake on the heading (sorry) so are the older 4 pot Audi TT rs 370mm the same ?
 

_Dejan_

Active Member
Mar 20, 2018
128
59
Audi TTRS 8J have same brakes as Cupra with Performance Pack, R or Carbon Edition. It have 370mm discs(8J0615301K) and 4 pot Brembo calipers(RED = 5F0073910D & 5F0073910E, BLACK = 5F0073910F & 5F0073910G).
 

Damo H

Carbon Snob
Staff member
Moderator
Oct 3, 2012
3,809
2,245
Car Length In Front
Even the newer 8 pots have the stupid rotors with incorrectly handed discs.

If I ever do enough miles in this car to need new discs going to get some Reyland ones.
 

_Dejan_

Active Member
Mar 20, 2018
128
59
As I have information discs are ok, problematic are OEM pads which cause that disc fail... With aftermark pads and OEM discs there are not report od issues...
 

Tara

Active Member
Jan 21, 2008
400
94
Bournemouth
The only differences I can see in oem part numbers is the Leon is 8J0615301F and the Audi 8J0615301K , when I spoke to Tarox they said they would supply the Leon and Audi with exactly the same disks.
 

Cupra Belfast

Active Member
Jun 11, 2016
309
39
Does anyone know if these 2 discs are exactly the same ? I've read they are and if you look closely you will see an Audi stamp but do they just use different part numbers , thanks in advance as I was thinking of getting a set for spare as I've already had mine reskimmed once and they are pretty reasonable and easier to find than my ones.
The performance pack 370mm discs I bought a few months ago came from a Seat dealership with the Audi stamps on them. The originals from the retrofit performance pack kit had the Audi stamp on them too. The 370mm Brembos are an Audi parts bin special.

The Seat part number is S8J0615301K The Audi part number ought to be markedly similar, likely with differing letters.

I've fitted Tarox pads. Already I'm pleased in comparison with the Brembo pads, with the lack of the sound from the god awful metal cores catching dust/dirt & squeaking. The cores have a habit of pushing the soft metal on the surface forwards, leaving a little lip where the dust collects. There was a minor squeak as the Tarox pads bedded in, pretty much gone now. The they cheep now & then, as of the metallic content of the compound. Nothing like before. I went for strada pads. I'm pretty sure the corsa pads would also eat the remarkably soft OEM discs, and would require the biblically expensive, cut from billet, Tarox discs. The Tarox pads stop the car well. They seem to be making more even contact with the disc. The Brembo pads ate discs in 15k miles. I do use the brakes, and think a particularly heavy session over the hills kind of finished them. I'm pretty sure it's an intentional design flaw with a sales angle, that the discs are eaten by the OEM pads.
 

Cupra Belfast

Active Member
Jun 11, 2016
309
39
There's a dual problem with the Brembo discs and pads. The Brembo discs are cast in one piece, cooled in a controlled manner (sprue) & heat treated. This leaves the metal inside softer, with the grain structure that's needed only on the surface and to an as best possible depth. The problem with the metal core'd OEM Brembo pads is the degree of heat that builds up on the 4 metal cores through the pad. The heat transferred when stationary with the brakes applied (a bigger problem with DSG cars, as of the lazy stop start driving they lend themselves to with thee foot on the brake pedal, as opposed to going into neutral & applying the hand brake) causes hot spots to form, readjusting the grain structure slightly each time and softening the metal. This can occur over the full circle of the disc on particularly heavy, long driving sessions, like track days of 'private country road' use. That's how the warping of the discs & groove wearing occurs. Seat were changing discs & pads like there's no tomorrow on the Nurburgring when setting the lap times for the hatch & ST (280 ST still the 'ring estate car lap record holder). The aftermarket pads from Tarox strada pads are one piece, no metal cores (I think the corsa are too, but a harder compound). This won't entirely solve the problem, but should diminish it somewhat. The Tarox discs are cut from billet, with the proper grain structure the whole way through them. They're joined to the rotor. That manufacturing method is much more preferable for a brake disc. They will last much longer with the use of a one piece pad with no cores, and would last longer with the Brembo pads too, but they'd still do those discs no good. I'm going to see how the discs look when the pad wear light comes on the next time round to see if I'm gong to bite the bullet and get the Tarox ones or if I can, hopefully get a second set of pads out of one set of discs. The Brembo discs have shot up in price over the last lot of months anyway, so they may be a false economy?
 

Tara

Active Member
Jan 21, 2008
400
94
Bournemouth
Called Reyland and they start off at £745 initially for a floating set and then £345 next time you need them which is expensive unless you are keeping it for a good few years as you can but the oem Brembo for about £350 online for a set of 2.
 

Tara

Active Member
Jan 21, 2008
400
94
Bournemouth
Called Reyland and they start off at £745 initially for a floating set and then £345 next time you need them which is expensive unless you are keeping it for a good few years as you can buy the oem Brembo for about £350 online for a set of 2.
 
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