what have you done to your car today ?

Rich.T

Active Member
Feb 15, 2020
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Ordered oil n filter and diverter valve from TPS.
I'll stick the valve on as soon as it turns up to see if it makes any difference.
 
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iammooks

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Nov 27, 2018
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Maybe cut your losses and look into a new csc ? Then weigh up what you’ve saved vs that. I’d just send the csc back haha


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Been thinking about it. I sent them a message to ask if they'd just send me a CSC but I'm not holding out much hope. Three different people have replied to the messages I've sent so it's one of those outfits where they're so big that they can't properly keep track of these things.


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g60stu

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Feb 9, 2003
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Been thinking about it. I sent them a message to ask if they'd just send me a CSC but I'm not holding out much hope. Three different people have replied to the messages I've sent so it's one of those outfits where they're so big that they can't properly keep track of these things.


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You could probably get a Sachs/LUK CSC from euros for 30-45 pounds. Might be better to cut your losses and go down that path. And the advantage of Euros is you can return items direct to their branches if you have issues. Good luck anyhow.
 
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smutts

Active Member
Apr 12, 2020
97
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Got a "new" (21 year old) two button Seat key from the breakers for £1, ( with the advise, "it will never work.")
Take both keys apart, frequency is on a label beneath battery, both 434 MHz, hopes rise a little, circuit boards different though, sigh.
Used the two key method for mk4 golf, as on yubetou (sorry, lost the link), and..........................................
it worked, astonished & very happy. Swap the metal key which also has the immobiliser chip & in business.
Fortunately the manual switches in the drivers door module lock are still compus mentus which makes this method possible.

Oh happy day, now to battle the peugeot.
 
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iammooks

Active Member
Nov 27, 2018
938
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You could probably get a Sachs/LUK CSC from euros for 30-45 pounds. Might be better to cut your losses and go down that path. And the advantage of Euros is you can return items direct to their branches if you have issues. Good luck anyhow.

I think I'm getting closer to a bit of a refund - they've offered me £20 and I've gone back to them and suggested £30, given that's what I can get on for from Euros. I think they've agreed to that, so we're all good there.

Was a bit of a ball ache, but it'll be good to have a perfect CSC.

In other news, the girlfriend drove the car yesterday and says it drives really well - that it feels really solid and together, so I'm feeling pretty good about myself there.

Thinking about doing my front wheel bearing sometime. Has anyone gone down the route of taking it all apart, and then getting a garage to press the old one out and put a new one in?


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3gte

Active Member
Mar 25, 2014
234
145
Northants
I think I'm getting closer to a bit of a refund - they've offered me £20 and I've gone back to them and suggested £30, given that's what I can get on for from Euros. I think they've agreed to that, so we're all good there.

Was a bit of a ball ache, but it'll be good to have a perfect CSC.

In other news, the girlfriend drove the car yesterday and says it drives really well - that it feels really solid and together, so I'm feeling pretty good about myself there.

Thinking about doing my front wheel bearing sometime. Has anyone gone down the route of taking it all apart, and then getting a garage to press the old one out and put a new one in?


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Got the guys at work to do mine, took a fair amount to press out as there's a circlip in there. It may be worth picking up a spare hub off ebay and doing a refurb so you literally just swap them over. Just be sure nothing has been ovalled (that got me, although the guys managed to rescue the GKN bearing I'd had put in)
 
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Connor H

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Dec 19, 2019
886
442
Essex
After running the standard DV for a few days , can safely say its better than the forge. Theres way more crispy action going on with the OEM unit
 
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iammooks

Active Member
Nov 27, 2018
938
505
Got the guys at work to do mine, took a fair amount to press out as there's a circlip in there. It may be worth picking up a spare hub off ebay and doing a refurb so you literally just swap them over. Just be sure nothing has been ovalled (that got me, although the guys managed to rescue the GKN bearing I'd had put in)

That's not something I'd considered - getting another hub and just doing a straight swap. It's one of those jobs where I can do about 95% of the work myself, but that last 5% is the most important part. Must be cheap enough to get the parts.

Should really have done it when I had the control arms out, but I didn't really check them until last weekend. MoT advisory said "sight play" but if that's slight play, I don't want to be driving a car with worse.


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Rich.T

Active Member
Feb 15, 2020
852
442
That's not something I'd considered - getting another hub and just doing a straight swap. It's one of those jobs where I can do about 95% of the work myself, but that last 5% is the most important part. Must be cheap enough to get the parts.

Should really have done it when I had the control arms out, but I didn't really check them until last weekend. MoT advisory said "sight play" but if that's slight play, I don't want to be driving a car with worse.


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Id ring round and find a garage that'll do the bearing swap for you. Shouldn't be to hard to find somewhere. Just make sure they've got a press. Otherwise they'll be swinging hammers at it.
Just give them the hub to save on labour.
 
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3gte

Active Member
Mar 25, 2014
234
145
Northants
That's not something I'd considered - getting another hub and just doing a straight swap. It's one of those jobs where I can do about 95% of the work myself, but that last 5% is the most important part. Must be cheap enough to get the parts.

Should really have done it when I had the control arms out, but I didn't really check them until last weekend. MoT advisory said "sight play" but if that's slight play, I don't want to be driving a car with worse.

The down time is reduced considerably and spares are dirt cheap, think I paid £60 for two Audi TT hubs (you don't want them) and cast arms. I ended up Hammeriting mine, changing the bearing, chasing out the various threads, changing ABS sensor, new splash guard. Then when it came to fitting it was about a couple of hours to swap the hub over (including cutting the tie rod end off because it didn't come quietly).
 
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Rich.T

Active Member
Feb 15, 2020
852
442
After running the standard DV for a few days , can safely say its better than the forge. Theres way more crispy action going on with the OEM unit
Mine turned up from TPS yesterday. Hope to get a chance to fit it soon to see what its like.
 
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iammooks

Active Member
Nov 27, 2018
938
505
Id ring round and find a garage that'll do the bearing swap for you. Shouldn't be to hard to find somewhere. Just make sure they've got a press. Otherwise they'll be swinging hammers at it.
Just give them the hub to save on labour.

Always important - if you don't see a bearing press in the shop, what are they putting it in with?

The down time is reduced considerably and spares are dirt cheap, think I paid £60 for two Audi TT hubs (you don't want them) and cast arms. I ended up Hammeriting mine, changing the bearing, chasing out the various threads, changing ABS sensor, new splash guard. Then when it came to fitting it was about a couple of hours to swap the hub over (including cutting the tie rod end off because it didn't come quietly).

Bloody tie rod ends. They never behave. My hacksaw paid for itself when I did mine a couple of years ago. I do give mine a wire brush and some lube every now and then, but I'm sure I'm going to round off that allen hole when I try to get them out next.

Think mine took 4 tonnes to press out? The guy doing it was impressed it took so much

So what you're saying is that my M10 threaded bar with two metal plates isn't going to cut it?


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smutts

Active Member
Apr 12, 2020
97
53
Always important - if you don't see a bearing press in the shop, what are they putting it in with?



Bloody tie rod ends. They never behave. My hacksaw paid for itself when I did mine a couple of years ago. I do give mine a wire brush and some lube every now and then, but I'm sure I'm going to round off that allen hole when I try to get them out next.



So what you're saying is that my M10 threaded bar with two metal plates isn't going to cut it?


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M20 would be more like it. I treated myself to a front wheel drive wheel bearing puller kit a few years ago.
The assorted sleeves ensure you can drive the new bearing in by the edges. Driven in by the center, it won't last long.
Also needed my 15 stones jumping on a pair of 18 inch spanners to pull it out.
Decent circlip pliers might save much swearing too.
 
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smutts

Active Member
Apr 12, 2020
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Think mine took 4 tonnes to press out? The guy doing it was impressed it took so much
The paving at the back of my house was all broken by me trying to remove a wheel bearing on a mk2 polo strut.
Sledgehammer was a fail.
Engineering works got it out at 12 tons.
I hate the things.
 
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3gte

Active Member
Mar 25, 2014
234
145
Northants
Bloody tie rod ends. They never behave. My hacksaw paid for itself when I did mine a couple of years ago. I do give mine a wire brush and some lube every now and then, but I'm sure I'm going to round off that allen hole when I try to get them out next.

Probably, I've never had one NOT round off the hex. 4½" grinder with a 1mm disc FTW!

So what you're saying is that my M10 threaded bar with two metal plates isn't going to cut it?

I mean you could give it a go I guess, it'd be good exercise if nothing else.

The circlip is fitted in a way you can't get at it unless you press out the hub first but the circlip isn't big enough to brace the whole bearing so you can get the hub out without risking bits of bearing being attached.
 
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iammooks

Active Member
Nov 27, 2018
938
505
Probably, I've never had one NOT round off the hex. 4½" grinder with a 1mm disc FTW!



I mean you could give it a go I guess, it'd be good exercise if nothing else.

The circlip is fitted in a way you can't get at it unless you press out the hub first but the circlip isn't big enough to brace the whole bearing so you can get the hub out without risking bits of bearing being attached.
It just sucks that I'll probably have to cut a perfectly good tie rod just because nobody's come up with a better way of securing a nut than this. I know in the States they love their cotter pins and castle nuts, and I used to think that was quite quaint, but they seem to have a much easier time getting ball joints and tie rods out. Of course, if I had a noisy gun, they'd probably come off no trouble too.

I think using an M10 bit of threaded rod would be a good exercise in totally ruining the thread on one. I managed to do that just getting a bushing out, so a wheel bearing? That'll eat it alive.

Just put in an order for a new CSC after faffing around for ages trying to make sure it was the right one. The only place that had what I was really after was the shop that sent the damaged one, so why they didn't just get one from stores, I'll never know. In the end, they refunded me £30, but with a voucher on eBay I got the new one for £25. Their operation is clearly too big to know what's going on - every time I messaged I got about five different responses from five different people.

I was tempted to use the damaged one - just file down the lip where it was bashed - but I noticed that the hole for the bolt has been flattened slightly, so it might not align properly. It's probably not as important as I'm making out, but if I'm taking the gearbox out, there's not a chance of me doing the job again.

Picked up a red-stitched leather handbrake gaiter too for £14. For years, my plastic one has been disintegrating a bit on the end. I used to think it was just the previous owner had a taste for sticky sweets, but I've cleaned it loads and it's still like that, so it'll be nice to cover it up.
 
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